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TheGoalNet

Composite Stick Repair

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If it was me, the other goalie wouldn't have left the building that day without paying up or giving me my choice of one of his sticks.   No satisfaction there? I would have gone to the people running the camp and stated my equipment was vandalized by one of their students so it's their responsibility. Sound harsh - don't really care - I work for a living and tending is just one of many expenses I have...

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On 7/20/2017 at 9:46 PM, 73white said:

Thanks for the advice but I ended up just pouring the mix over the crank, I left it for 48 hours and it worked quite well. I was surprised I could flex the stick with out it snapping. Sadly I never got to use the stick. I was talking about gear to another goalie at a christian hockey player camp and the goalie from the opposing "team"  over heard me mention the stick was broken. He came over, grabbed the stick and asked if it was the one I was talking about. I nodded and he snapped it over his leg, dropped it in the trash and left, my team was shocked lol.

Dude whaaaaaat the fuuuuuuuuuuuck????  I'm dying to know how the following conversation went lol.

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7 hours ago, bunnyman666 said:

Lundy uses wood. There is probably more wood in the NHL than it appears. It still seems that the most popular is wood shaft and foam paddle.

The Sher-Wood G5030 is a very nice stick and is made the old-fashioned way. I was very happy with mine. 

Weirdly enough, I am on the composite bandwagon, coming from several years of using wood. Whilst being an expensive habit, they can be repaired. I am going to be buying composite supplies to facilitate these eventual repairs. I don’t feel the “pingyness” that others feel. Of course one could fill the hollow shaft with expanding foam to kill the vibration; however, it would also kill the flex for shooting. 

Could you be more specific on the repairs...is it just for shaft repairs or cracks in the blade as well? I have a 1S that just cracked in the blade. I would be willing to try to fix it if possible but have no idea what I would need and if it is easy or complicated...

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6 hours ago, 1C5 said:

Could you be more specific on the repairs...is it just for shaft repairs or cracks in the blade as well? I have a 1S that just cracked in the blade. I would be willing to try to fix it if possible but have no idea what I would need and if it is easy or complicated...

Shaft or blade. You can repair with carbon fibre tape and epoxy. You can even do small repairs with household epoxy mixed with graphite powder. 

Not all that complicated at all!

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1 hour ago, bunnyman666 said:

Shaft or blade. You can repair with carbon fibre tape and epoxy. You can even do small repairs with household epoxy mixed with graphite powder. 

Not all that complicated at all!

Could you let me know a good epoxy to try? I'll give it a go. 

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5 hours ago, bunnyman666 said:

For the graphite/epoxy repair?

Here is the crack. Let me know the items you would suggest on this. 

01B76D50-DC25-4866-A675-851D191E2C90.jpeg

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2 hours ago, 1C5 said:

Here is the crack. Let me know the items you would suggest on this. 

01B76D50-DC25-4866-A675-851D191E2C90.jpeg

Heavy duty household epoxy and powdered graphite. Squirt the epoxy onto a piece of cardboard, put a generous amount of graphite powder in your blobs of resin and hardener (the two parts), mix together, and spread into the crack. I use chop sticks. Tape down with sock or electrical tape. 

For a more permanent repair, you can put a piece or two of carbon tape over that. That would require a bit more work and supplies.

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6 hours ago, bunnyman666 said:

Heavy duty household epoxy and powdered graphite. Squirt the epoxy onto a piece of cardboard, put a generous amount of graphite powder in your blobs of resin and hardener (the two parts), mix together, and spread into the crack. I use chop sticks. Tape down with sock or electrical tape. 

For a more permanent repair, you can put a piece or two of carbon tape over that. That would require a bit more work and supplies.

Ok I did the epoxy and powdered graphite and now it's just curing. 

I want to get some carbon tape to put over it now. How should I tape it? Like hockey tape down and around the whole blade or just small strips across or down the break?

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5 hours ago, 1C5 said:

Ok I did the epoxy and powdered graphite and now it's just curing. 

I want to get some carbon tape to put over it now. How should I tape it? Like hockey tape down and around the whole blade or just small strips across or down the break?

You need the following:

1) 50 grit sand paper

2) mineral spirits or MEK

3) 1” wide bidirectional carbon fibre tape

4) West Systems epoxy kit, slow cure (ask your dealer for guidance)

5) electrical tape

6) cheap office scissors, new

7) new chop sticks

8) clear plastic disposable mixing cups

9) lint-free, disposable towels

10) a food scale

11) plastic paint pan for roller paint

12) plastic drop cloths for your work space

13) paint mask or respirator for both sanding AND epoxy

Measure the area to repair. Sand outside the repair an inch each way. Just sand enough to rough up the epoxy. We are talking of “kissing” the area, but you will need a mechanical bond. Moisten a lint-free paper towel with MEK or mineral spirits and wipe until the towels are clean. Normally I say acetone, but you will most likely have foam underneath a blade. Acetone destroys most foams. 

You will need three pieces of carbon fibre tape: one for the centre of the crack and two for each side around the crack. Cut your three strips of carbon tape to fit the length of the repair. Weigh the tape on food scale. With West Systems, you use a metered pump. Make certain you use the metered pumps and purchase if necessary. Follow directions for how many pumps. Your epoxy will probably weigh more than the carbon fabric.

Mix hardener and resin with chop stick. You will pump both resin and hardener into the same cup. Make certain it is at least the same weight as the fabric, if not more. Pour mixed epoxy into paint pan. Soak fabric, and use the other chop stick to make certain that your fabric gets penetrated. Smear a thin coat of epoxy onto repair area. Place your wet tape strips onto repair area, one strip over the centre, and one on each side over-lapping the crack. Squeegee off the excess resin with a clean credit card. Wrap electrical tape over entire area. Cure for 24 to 48 hours with an incandescent bulb, though that is not necessary. Remove the tape and you’re golden.

Some people poke holes in the tape. I have found that if you keep the amount of resin consistent with the weight of the cloth, you don’t have to poke holes in the tape; the holes in the tape work as a bleeder layer. But compacting the carbon tape is VERY necessary. 

If you have more questions, don’t hesitate to contact me. 

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You can also use fiberfix tape or patches.  They've worked well for me and are super easy to use.  Reasonably priced too.

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If anyone tests @bunnyman666 deeper fix, please let us know!

i did graphite powder and epoxy. It got me through a bunch more skates and then broke again in the same spot. Great fix in a pinch, but not permanent 

I used clear Gorilla glue tape, like a packing tape, over the repair too 

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9 hours ago, tony20 said:

You can also use fiberfix tape or patches.  They've worked well for me and are super easy to use.  Reasonably priced too.

Never tried fiberfix. Wasn’t that the stuff pitched on Shark Tank and is water activated?

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22 hours ago, bunnyman666 said:

Never tried fiberfix. Wasn’t that the stuff pitched on Shark Tank and is water activated?

Yes that's the stuff. 

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1 hour ago, 1C5 said:

Yes that's the stuff. 

I have not tried it for any repairs, but did an experiment with the stuff and it probably would do an admirable job for this application. 

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On 12/20/2017 at 5:37 AM, bunnyman666 said:

I have not tried it for any repairs, but did an experiment with the stuff and it probably would do an admirable job for this application. 

I followed your advice to fix my crack and then added a bunch of the fiberfix too. 

Used it for 2 games so far and holding up great. Will report back as I take more shots with it. 

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1 hour ago, 1C5 said:

I followed your advice to fix my crack and then added a bunch of the fiberfix too. 

Used it for 2 games so far and holding up great. Will report back as I take more shots with it. 

Fantastic!!!!

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9 hours ago, TheGoalNet said:

@bunnyman666 - If you’re still out... don’t laugh at me!

Ha... did the same thing to my 2S Pro just last week. Turned out pretty well. I've had 2 skates with it and it feels pretty solid. I'll also note that my crack was self inflicted during a brief and uncharacteristic moment of emotion while on the ice. The peeling and flaking of layers started to occur as a result of the crack and so I though I'd slap some graphite and epoxy on to fend off further degradation. As strong as these composite sticks are... Goal Post 1 - 2S Pro 0.

 image.thumb.png.6b2dba82c9c30ca58b398eb793dc2ee6.png

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Pretty sure @bunnyman666‘s technique was killer. I would say this is great for damage and chips, but is maybe not strong enough for a full broken stick repair. Definitely worth while to save your favorite stick 

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