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estogoalie

Cut-Across

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I filmed my kid getting beat on a similar type of goal that I have also been struggling with, and can't seem to find the answer to. When someone comes breaking in on a break-away down the side, usually with a fair amount of speed, and then cuts across in front, and flips it into the far side that is wide open....how do you stop that? Poke-check is one possibility, but let's skip that for now, because they can be out of reach, or could deke around. The best I would say, would be to move up further and match the attackers speed coming back, and hope to slide to the far side. But still, you'll probably be sprawling, and leave some net open above the pads.

...any other ideas?

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Matching speed and timing your push will usually get you in position at least imo. 

That said, I just had this happen other night. Good timing, good push but guy was planning 5 hole entire time. Got me...

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Challenge more and fall back with the same speed as the shooter and hand proximity should help(get your hand closer to the puck ) someone else may correct me though 

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I see a couple mistakes, and the three backcheckers coasting doesn’t help at all ...

goalie committed before shot release

passive upright butterfly (should lean to his right and project gloves forward) into the puck 

Based on camera angle, depth is hard to gauge but it looks like he could be a bit more aggressive and out of the blue paint 

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Gap control and timing. It would appear that he retreated too far too early giving the shooter enough space to shoot around him. And it appears he pushes late keeping himself square to the shooter instead of the puck. 

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Nice post.  Good to see new technique topics.

In the video the initial drop is too passive and straight down with the attempt to slide over to the blocker side happening too late.

You know the classic inverted Y theory of breakaways? Planning to end an aggressive slide backwards and sideways landing at a post when you start in the middle?

That would still apply to this play in the video.  Had the initial drop more aggressive with backwards and sideways momentum off a push, the shooters speed could have been better matched and his momentum to that blocker post better matched.

Like Chenner said, the butterfly is too passive and static starting the initial motion too deep without momentum.

OR you could lunge forward hands first to block the shooters path ala Tim Thomas. Not advisable and risky, but damnit it's so fun to watch :)

Edited by seagoal
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I think he goes down way too early...but at the same time it's about being there before the shooter if he's reading that he will do that move which they usually do, can also sneak that 5hole. 

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While this is coming from RVH... you can see when he gets the shooter coming across... that his far side leg takes a more aggressive position and his blocker is projecting towards the puck.

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Just a suggestion, on p55 of On Goaltending by Jacques Plante, "when a player cuts 15 feet in front of the net, move toward him and in the same direction as he is skating". I don't know how to post the 4 illustrations but the first shows the player coming on the goalie's right and cutting across in front of him to the left. At the start of the illustrations, the goalie is squared up at the top of his crease and to his right. The angle is covered, in other words.  In the following 3 illustrations, the skater cuts in front to the goalie's left. As the skater does so, the goalie moves with the skater to the goalie's left but also projects forward narrowing the space between the skater and the goalie while remaining square to the net. I hope this makes some sense but it does work. Anyway, out of all the literature out there, this book is the only one of which I am aware to address the specific situation outlined by Esto. What Plante describes is similar to what BadAngle suggests with the key commonality being to project forward while moving laterally. I can cite you a passage but I've never been able to do it in real life. 

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11 hours ago, Fullright said:

Just a suggestion, on p55 of On Goaltending by Jacques Plante, "when a player cuts 15 feet in front of the net, move toward him and in the same direction as he is skating". I don't know how to post the 4 illustrations but the first shows the player coming on the goalie's right and cutting across in front of him to the left. At the start of the illustrations, the goalie is squared up at the top of his crease and to his right. The angle is covered, in other words.  In the following 3 illustrations, the skater cuts in front to the goalie's left. As the skater does so, the goalie moves with the skater to the goalie's left but also projects forward narrowing the space between the skater and the goalie while remaining square to the net. I hope this makes some sense but it does work. Anyway, out of all the literature out there, this book is the only one of which I am aware to address the specific situation outlined by Esto. What Plante describes is similar to what BadAngle suggests with the key commonality being to project forward while moving laterally. I can cite you a passage but I've never been able to do it in real life. 

Can you maybe try taking pictures with your phone and posting directly?

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On ‎3‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 8:25 AM, SaveByRichter35 said:

Can you maybe try taking pictures with your phone and posting directly?

Yes, be happy to. Had to blast out of town after my post....take a shot at the illustrations tonight.

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