Jump to content

glove angles


Recommended Posts

so i have a pretty shitty glove hand, not gonna lie. i play more of what tomy ames from goaliecreasenet calls a "fingers up" position, where i keep my glove high up so i can track the puck better. he said that a good break for that positioning is a 590, but the 590 is a 75 degree break, i do more of a fingers to thumb closure, isnt that a 90 degree, or a 580? i dont want to invest in a piece of gear that isnt right for my style of play. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Max27 said:

so i have a pretty shitty glove hand, not gonna lie. i play more of what tomy ames from goaliecreasenet calls a "fingers up" position, where i keep my glove high up so i can track the puck better. he said that a good break for that positioning is a 590, but the 590 is a 75 degree break, i do more of a fingers to thumb closure, isnt that a 90 degree, or a 580? i dont want to invest in a piece of gear that isnt right for my style of play. 

I believe you're correct about Tomy's use of a 590 but it is a 60 degree break. 580 is a 90 degree closure and will give you a full fingers to palm (this is what I use.) 600 break is 75 degrees and perhaps worth giving a shot as it's obviously in between.

Really what matters is you're ability to catch... not making your hand conform to a glove you'll never be comfortable in. I know for me a 580 break is the most natural break for me when catching. I'd use it all day long over any other break. I can play fingers up with a 580 but I can just as easily keep it horizontal. In fact one benefit of a 580 break is the flat bottom of the glove and it's ability to seal against your pads when down in a butterfly.

Not to sound like a broken record... but your best bet is to go to a shop (if you have one nearby) and give each a try if you can (580 is getting harder to find as it doesn't lend itself to puck handling as well as the 590 and 600.)  Pick one that feels natural on your hand. Being comfortable and confident with your mitt (and knowing you can flash the occasional windmill) will serve you much better than a glove you're second guessing when a shot is coming glove side. My theory has always been to eliminate the distractions. The less I think about my gear (because I have confidence in it) the more I can focus on keeping the puck out of the net.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, BadAngle41 said:

I believe you're correct about Tomy's use of a 590 but it is a 60 degree break. 580 is a 90 degree closure and will give you a full fingers to palm (this is what I use.) 600 break is 75 degrees and perhaps worth giving a shot as it's obviously in between.

Really what matters is you're ability to catch... not making your hand conform to a glove you'll never be comfortable in. I know for me a 580 break is the most natural break for me when catching. I'd use it all day long over any other break. I can play fingers up with a 580 but I can just as easily keep it horizontal. In fact one benefit of a 580 break is the flat bottom of the glove and it's ability to seal against your pads when down in a butterfly.

Not to sound like a broken record... but your best bet is to go to a shop (if you have one nearby) and give each a try if you can (580 is getting harder to find as it doesn't lend itself to puck handling as well as the 590 and 600.)  Pick one that feels natural on your hand. Being comfortable and confident with your mitt (and knowing you can flash the occasional windmill) will serve you much better than a glove you're second guessing when a shot is coming glove side. My theory has always been to eliminate the distractions. The less I think about my gear (because I have confidence in it) the more I can focus on keeping the puck out of the net.

thanks! i think i will go with the 580. i use a 600 right now and it just feels kinda odd for whatever reason. the glove is completley broken in, i just cant close it, and when i do close it, it hurts my thumb 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Max27 said:

thanks! i think i will go with the 580. i use a 600 right now and it just feels kinda odd for whatever reason. the glove is completley broken in, i just cant close it, and when i do close it, it hurts my thumb 

If it turns out to be the right break for you... you'll never want to wear anything else. I had a dark period in my life when I tried both a Vaughn and a Brian's... but I came back to the light and ordered 2 580 gloves with my last custom set... just in case.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, BadAngle41 said:

If it turns out to be the right break for you... you'll never want to wear anything else. I had a dark period in my life when I tried both a Vaughn and a Brian's... but I came back to the light and ordered 2 580 gloves with my last custom set... just in case.

yeah i think it will. if i can catch the puck or pretty much just stop the puck in general, i wont switch out of that geae

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, BadAngle41 said:

If it turns out to be the right break for you... you'll never want to wear anything else. I had a dark period in my life when I tried both a Vaughn and a Brian's... but I came back to the light and ordered 2 580 gloves with my last custom set... just in case.

do you know any gloves i can get retail/stock with a 580?

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Max27 said:

do you know any gloves i can get retail/stock with a 580?

5 hours ago, southpawtendy48 said:

Here, hope this helps, only one I could find unfortunately, I’ll send more if I do 

http://goal.thehockeyshop.com/ccm-premier-pro-580-senior-trapper-demo-fleet.html

580 Breaks are pretty hard to come by stock. Mine were custom ordered. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, southpawtendy48 said:

Here, hope this helps, only one I could find unfortunately, I’ll send more if I do 

http://goal.thehockeyshop.com/ccm-premier-pro-580-senior-trapper-demo-fleet.html

52 minutes ago, BadAngle41 said:

580 Breaks are pretty hard to come by stock. Mine were custom ordered. 

i found on goaliemonkey a model of the premier pro that comes with a 580 with a pro palm for a little over 315$. Thanks everyone.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2018 at 11:45 PM, Max27 said:

gear not geae typo 

You know you can edit your posts, right?  You don't need to make another post to correct a typo.

Wear a glove that you feel comfortable wearing.  Not a glove that some guy says is the correct angle to wear for a certain style of play.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m a 580 guy.  The 60*s just feel weird and I can’t catch the damn puck.  I feel my glove hand is one of my stronger points.  And I was a catcher in baseball. 

That at said I bought a 590 koho revolution 587 “vintage” glove. 

Edited by Mike24
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

I don’t really know much about the break angles in gloves, but I’m looking to buy a new Vaughn full set and debating between the V7 XR and XF as far as catchers go... I’m coming from an older Brian’s M-Series and had really good luck with it. Anyone know much about these catchers and be able to make recommendations?

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, colejt30 said:

Hi there,

I don’t really know much about the break angles in gloves, but I’m looking to buy a new Vaughn full set and debating between the V7 XR and XF as far as catchers go... I’m coming from an older Brian’s M-Series and had really good luck with it. Anyone know much about these catchers and be able to make recommendations?

http://goal.thehockeyshop.com/vaughn-v7-xr-and-xf-whats-the-difference/

Just scroll down a bit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, colejt30 said:

Hi there,

I don’t really know much about the break angles in gloves, but I’m looking to buy a new Vaughn full set and debating between the V7 XR and XF as far as catchers go... I’m coming from an older Brian’s M-Series and had really good luck with it. Anyone know much about these catchers and be able to make recommendations?

Basically, in short, the XR would be most familiar to a CCM 590 while the XF is more on the traditional Vaughn angle (more of a full hand closure, so in between a 580 and 590), It also depends on if you prefer a one piece cuff or a more flexible two piece cuff.

edit: my bad. a more traditional Vaughn glove like the 5500 would be more similar to a CCM 600 break. 

Edited by southpawtendy48
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, southpawtendy48 said:

Basically, in short, the XR would be most familiar to a CCM 590 while the XF is more on the traditional Vaughn angle (more of a full hand closure, so in between a 580 and 590), It also depends on if you prefer a one piece cuff or a more flexible two piece cuff.

It's the traditional Vaughn more between 590 and 600? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...

Bringing this one back for an odd question.

How is a glove's break built into a glove? Is it how they cut the pattern? Is it where it's sewn together? Is it where they place the plastics? 

Can a glove with a given break be reshaped into another break?

I might have more questions but this will due for starts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RichMan said:

Bringing this one back for an odd question.

How is a glove's break built into a glove?  Is it how they cut the pattern? Yes. Is it where it's sewn together? Yes.  Is it where they place the plastics? Yes

Can a glove with a given break be reshaped into another break? Generally speaking, No. Potential exceptions:  Warrior gloves with removable palms.  Optik 1

I might have more questions but this will due for starts.

 

Edited by Puckstopper
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Changing the plastics inside you can change the break line. The plastics are the only solid thing that defines the break line.

Then when trying to change the break you have to fight the jenpro that is gotten used to. Padding like felt isn't any problem.

How the attempted new break line, with new angle and/or position will work with the glove as a whole is a question of it's own.

To do this you basically have to make atleast new plastics, maybe new set of holes for the lacing and what else to make it work.

I've made some smallish break modifications with almost all of the gloves I've refurbished. Some were a must to make the glove work better, some were just for doing it and trying how it would work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...