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Any goalies playing after hip replacement or resurfacing?


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On 7/6/2020 at 12:03 AM, Telfo said:

I was told the other day that I need both hips shaved down due to bone spurs/extra bone growth causing FAI.  I’m 35 and this thread is terrifying me 

Has it done at 40 on my left hip... right will be done in the relative near future... but it's far better than replacement in terms of buying time before what is likely inevitable. For me... the toughest part is the constant stretching to take advantage of the removal of the structural impingement. Hip flexor etc now is my limiting factor... not to mention the arthritis due to the complete lack of labrum and cartilage in the joint.

But it functions and I can still play.

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9 hours ago, SaveByRichter35 said:

I haven't played since December.  Ever since some time in either April or May, I don't quite recall when, my right knee has been bothering me.  Its the same knee I injured a few years ago, slight meniscus tear.  I know I didn't do anything to tweak it recently.  At least, I don't recall a moment where I was like "oww that hurt."  It was just kind of sudden where bending down at the knees and coming back up again hurts.  I am assuming its from lack of my once/twice a week stretching that I would do before games as well as the lack of playing to keep me limber.  I need to do better for myself and start stretching every night to get myself back into the swing of things.

sadly, once it tears a little, it can tear a little more.  Something as simple as rolling over in bed while you sleep, if your foot does not move completely with the rest of the leg, it can torque it a bit and tear a bit

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14 hours ago, Naz said:

sadly, once it tears a little, it can tear a little more.  Something as simple as rolling over in bed while you sleep, if your foot does not move completely with the rest of the leg, it can torque it a bit and tear a bit

Lovely.  I need to get some xrays done for my VA Disability compensation claim and my knee is in the paperwork from an injury I sustained while overseas so we shall see what is going on in there.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm 42 been fighting arthritis in the hips since 26.  Really limited flexibility on left side.  Been able to manage up till now with lots of stretching, exercises, physio, massage and acupuncture.  Now just not enough.  Can't get into stance or move side to side without pain since getting back on ice last month.  Have physician apt later this month. Going to push to get on resurface wait list.  In meantime have Prolotherapy apt at end of month. Figure it can't hurt.  If I respond to it, at least it will ease the pain while I wait for resurface.  Can't play at all right now which sucks.

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  • 5 months later...

First Post here....I came upon this thread after suffering what I feel was a pretty serious hip injury today in net.  I wanted to post both for answers to some of the questions I've seen, and also to ask - ultimately saving this thread and revisiting it for others' follow ups.  

I've had some hip problems after I turned 30 from playing goal later in life, sprint training, and squats (other sports).  I ended up going up to the Lahey Clinic/Hospital in Lexington, MA, and after a couple of visits and scans, it was decided that I had been suffering from impingement.  I ended up getting the Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) surgery.  The surgeon told me it took way longer once he saw what was going on in there.  They did it arthroscopically from anterior like a previous poster.  It took almost 6 hours and they cleaned out some cartilage, re attached the labrum, and shaved down the bone to a better shape.  That was in April of 2015.  Within months, pain still didnt go away and it never really "took".  

I've been holding off total hip replacement as I'm 38 now and I've been told to hold off as long as I can.  I've been playing a lot of goal lately and a lot of beach doubles volleyball in the summer, and my hip is just throbbing 24/7.  Luckily the hospital network our insurance is in, happens to be the best hip surgeons in the area and cost will be pretty much covered - so I've been thinking about getting the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR).  Using the actual UK equipment and procedure, I'm wondering what goaltenders have actually been able to continue on playing net after a BHR.  I hear both sides as far as total hip - some still can play, some cant strap on pads and butterfly at all and have to play out.  I want to play goal or nothing.  My injury today forced me to make an immediate appointment with hip specialist, and going to weigh options.  

Bottom line for me - the FAI isn't going to hold up for a goaltender.  If there's cartilage they're cleaning out, it's game over.  A lot of these docs don't REALLY get it for our position.  The hip joint (even if you do all the mobility exercises) is so tight, you'll never get cartilage back in there and grow.  Also, most likely, the labrum will re-tear, and the bone shave will actually cause new spurts from bone scaring.  It seems like total hip, or BHR is the only way to go, and I'm hoping I can get away with a BHR and play goal in full force.  That's what I'd like to ask/add to the conversation and I wish everyone luck.  Please keep this thread alive with results or stories of pro's who've been able to play high level with such invasive and structurally altering procedures.  

 

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The procedures are constantly evolving. When I underwent total hip replacement in 1997 the only options were the type of material used in the making of the hardware. I now hear from some friends that they had an assortment of options - incision from the front rather than side being less invasive, newer, stronger, lighter materials, no need for an overnight stay in hospital, many more I am sure.

I put off knee replacement for over 20 years, opting for physiotherapy, injections and a few arthroscopic procedures before taking the calculated plunge.

I am 71 and only COVID-19 restrictions are keeping me on the sidelines.  It worked for me, your mileage may vary.  

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On 1/13/2021 at 9:19 PM, Cool Runnings said:

First Post here....I came upon this thread after suffering what I feel was a pretty serious hip injury today in net.  I wanted to post both for answers to some of the questions I've seen, and also to ask - ultimately saving this thread and revisiting it for others' follow ups.  

I've had some hip problems after I turned 30 from playing goal later in life, sprint training, and squats (other sports).  I ended up going up to the Lahey Clinic/Hospital in Lexington, MA, and after a couple of visits and scans, it was decided that I had been suffering from impingement.  I ended up getting the Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) surgery.  The surgeon told me it took way longer once he saw what was going on in there.  They did it arthroscopically from anterior like a previous poster.  It took almost 6 hours and they cleaned out some cartilage, re attached the labrum, and shaved down the bone to a better shape.  That was in April of 2015.  Within months, pain still didnt go away and it never really "took".  

I've been holding off total hip replacement as I'm 38 now and I've been told to hold off as long as I can.  I've been playing a lot of goal lately and a lot of beach doubles volleyball in the summer, and my hip is just throbbing 24/7.  Luckily the hospital network our insurance is in, happens to be the best hip surgeons in the area and cost will be pretty much covered - so I've been thinking about getting the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR).  Using the actual UK equipment and procedure, I'm wondering what goaltenders have actually been able to continue on playing net after a BHR.  I hear both sides as far as total hip - some still can play, some cant strap on pads and butterfly at all and have to play out.  I want to play goal or nothing.  My injury today forced me to make an immediate appointment with hip specialist, and going to weigh options.  

Bottom line for me - the FAI isn't going to hold up for a goaltender.  If there's cartilage they're cleaning out, it's game over.  A lot of these docs don't REALLY get it for our position.  The hip joint (even if you do all the mobility exercises) is so tight, you'll never get cartilage back in there and grow.  Also, most likely, the labrum will re-tear, and the bone shave will actually cause new spurts from bone scaring.  It seems like total hip, or BHR is the only way to go, and I'm hoping I can get away with a BHR and play goal in full force.  That's what I'd like to ask/add to the conversation and I wish everyone luck.  Please keep this thread alive with results or stories of pro's who've been able to play high level with such invasive and structurally altering procedures.  

 

Interesting thought about BHR. I'm more-less in a similar boat after having had my FAI back in 2018. The join itself has that throbbing you describe as well as what feel like some tears even though it was also cleaned up like yours was. I went in to see my ortho again a little over a month ago... his comment was that he had cleaned out so much... the only thing worth doing surgery again for me would be replacement.

There are options however for simply trying to reduce inflammation... cortisone and biologics. The biologics being PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) or Stem Cell injections. Per my guy... either could help... but there is little data to support the effectiveness... and consequently it'll likely be a decent out of pocket expense. Between the unknown effectiveness and cost... I have been considering getting the cortisone. If it helps calm the inflammation and I still have a decent amount of pain... I'll know it's something more... play until I can't... and maybe end my career between the pipes.

I know some guys have played with replacements... but it's my understanding (and I could be wrong on this) that it's like you're given a brand new set of tires... albeit the last set you'll get. Playing goal on them is essentially like doing burnouts... and I'm too young to put too much needless wear and tear on them. 

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Hip surgery is a crazy thing.  For every story out there like Thatcher Demko's it seems there are 10 more where people don't get the results they expected from FAI surgery.  I myself have torn labrums and cam impingements on both sides.  No idea when the labrums were injured, but I haven't been able to do the splits in a game situation since my early 20s (10+ years ago now), and since those cam impingements are on the outside of the femurs it's likely those developed in high school and college.  My right side has no symptoms, but lingering issues on my left side led me to seek out an evaluation from a physio to assess what I'm dealing with and she ended up recommending an MRI.  I went through the free Butterfly program Maria Mountain put together twice and had some nice results from it, but far less the second time around.  I then bought her Strategic Mobility for Goalies program and, combined with some weekly PT sessions consisting of cupping, dry needling, and now some Pilates work, through just the first 3 weeks of SMfG I'm having some really impressive results.  I wouldn't say that left hip is quite at 100% but the strength and control I have in my hips compared to when I started is impressive, especially for such a short period of time.

Part of me wonders if I'd get even better results if the mechanical issues were cleaned up, but then again that could just make things worse and bring on arthritis where I really don't have that now.  I'm 100% confident I can do everything I want to physically - except play goal.  I can play forward, I can run, I can jump, cut, squat, deadlift, etc. etc., but the unique stresses of playing between the pipes scare me still.  What a crazy position we've all chosen to play.

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1 hour ago, BadAngle41 said:

Interesting thought about BHR. I'm more-less in a similar boat after having had my FAI back in 2018. The join itself has that throbbing you describe as well as what feel like some tears even though it was also cleaned up like yours was. I went in to see my ortho again a little over a month ago... his comment was that he had cleaned out so much... the only thing worth doing surgery again for me would be replacement.

There are options however for simply trying to reduce inflammation... cortisone and biologics. The biologics being PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) or Stem Cell injections. Per my guy... either could help... but there is little data to support the effectiveness... and consequently it'll likely be a decent out of pocket expense. Between the unknown effectiveness and cost... I have been considering getting the cortisone. If it helps calm the inflammation and I still have a decent amount of pain... I'll know it's something more... play until I can't... and maybe end my career between the pipes.

I know some guys have played with replacements... but it's my understanding (and I could be wrong on this) that it's like you're given a brand new set of tires... albeit the last set you'll get. Playing goal on them is essentially like doing burnouts... and I'm too young to put too much needless wear and tear on them. 

The thing I find so intriguing about BHR is if the hardware fails, there's still the option to go with a full replacement later.  If you can make it to, say, 40 before getting a BHR and that lasts 20 years, then you do a traditional replacement at 60, you're more or less going to be mobile until your days are over.

Hope you can make your originals last awhile longer.  Seems if you play this position long enough, for many of us our bodies tell us when we're done long before we get to decide for ourselves.  I don't know how some of these 50+ and 60+ dudes are out there playing goal still.  There's no way I'll be able to play the position the way I want to by the time I'm that age.

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26 minutes ago, AdamL said:

 There's no way I'll be able to play the position the way I want to by the time I'm that age.

Therein lies the key.  As we age various elements, physical and mental, confront us. I was an Air Traffic Controller for 35 years. Was I as efficient in my latter years, probably not. But the solution is to recognize and adjust your standards.

In ATC that may have meant to limit the number of aircraft under my control at any one time. In hockey I have been fortunate to play in age and talent levels suitable to my abilities.  In my mid 50's I quit hockey for a couple of years (osteoarthritis) but upon retiring my wife and I moved across Canada to a drier, warmer climate. This provided some pain relief for me and my wife's allergies were reduced.

There I discovered a 55+ Seniors Hockey Club that required a goaltender - back in the game.  Did I make the same moves in net that I could even 5 years earlier?  Probably not, but my game evolved into more standup, becoming better at playing my angles, and having some custom gear which was lighter, more protection and just a little oversized (hey, this isn't the NHL).

Some of the regulars on here will have followed my oft told tales of new gear, medical procedures, my now 5 year use of CBD for pain relief, plus retiring and unretiring a couple of times. This now my second season of playing with our 70+ team.  Are we as good as the 55+, HELL NO!  Do we enjoy the game as much as those 55+ kids, HELL, MORE!

It''s all relative.

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31 minutes ago, Wonder35 said:

Therein lies the key.  As we age various elements, physical and mental, confront us. I was an Air Traffic Controller for 35 years. Was I as efficient in my latter years, probably not. But the solution is to recognize and adjust your standards.

In ATC that may have meant to limit the number of aircraft under my control at any one time. In hockey I have been fortunate to play in age and talent levels suitable to my abilities.  In my mid 50's I quit hockey for a couple of years (osteoarthritis) but upon retiring my wife and I moved across Canada to a drier, warmer climate. This provided some pain relief for me and my wife's allergies were reduced.

There I discovered a 55+ Seniors Hockey Club that required a goaltender - back in the game.  Did I make the same moves in net that I could even 5 years earlier?  Probably not, but my game evolved into more standup, becoming better at playing my angles, and having some custom gear which was lighter, more protection and just a little oversized (hey, this isn't the NHL).

Some of the regulars on here will have followed my oft told tales of new gear, medical procedures, my now 5 year use of CBD for pain relief, plus retiring and unretiring a couple of times. This now my second season of playing with our 70+ team.  Are we as good as the 55+, HELL NO!  Do we enjoy the game as much as those 55+ kids, HELL, MORE!

It''s all relative.

That’s awesome!  I’ll be truly blessed if I’m able to enjoy the game for the next 36 years until I hit my 70th birthday.  Very cool to hear that you’re out there at 70 standing in front of flying rubber.  

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I'm 68 years old now and had both hips replaced about 15 years ago (more from 50 years of hardcourt tennis than hockey)😄. Took me about 6 months to get back on the tennis court, then decided I wanted to resume my goalie career as well. 

Now playing 3 times a week with all levels of players at pickup and having no pain or issues at all. If you are having pain I highly recommend getting it done, and actually the younger the better, as healing and rehab is much faster than if you wait. 

I also chose the ceramic ball and ceramic cup which never wears out, and unlike the metal on metal does not release harmful elements into your bloodstream.

One other suggestion.  Find a surgeon who uses the anterior approach to do the replacement.  About half the rehab time because if they go in the front they only have to push the muscles apart to insert the hardware.  If you go the posterior route, they have to cut the muscles and stitch them back together.

Good luck and I hope this doesn't reach you too late. Sorry, just saw this post.

Steve

IMG_6102 (2).PNG

Edited by CamWardFan
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On ‎1‎/‎17‎/‎2021 at 6:32 PM, CamWardFan said:

I'm 68 years old now and had both hips replaced about 15 years ago (more from 50 years of hardcourt tennis than hockey)😄. Took me about 6 months to get back on the tennis court, then decided I wanted to resume my goalie career as well. 

Now playing 3 times a week with all levels of players at pickup and having no pain or issues at all. If you are having pain I highly recommend getting it done, and actually the younger the better, as healing and rehab is much faster than if you wait. 

I also chose the ceramic ball and ceramic cup which never wears out, and unlike the metal on metal does not release harmful elements into your bloodstream.

One other suggestion.  Find a surgeon who uses the anterior approach to do the replacement.  About half the rehab time because if they go in the front they only have to push the muscles apart to insert the hardware.  If you go the posterior route, they have to cut the muscles and stitch them back together.

Good luck and I hope this doesn't reach you too late. Sorry, just saw this post.

Steve

IMG_6102 (2).PNG

Are you 68 in that picture? If so, I'd have guessed 20 years younger!

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