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OGs of Innovation


TheGoalNet
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12 hours ago, TitanG said:

If we add mask tech, is the current style of mask attributable to Harrison? I think Tony Esposito was the first with a cage on his old school mask, but that's more akin to the old style mask rather than the new style. Could also throw in the helmet/cage combos since the original mask cages came from there.

Good call, the interesting thing here too is that Harrison masks were never that available to the public either. Itech definitely made that style mask attainable.

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11 hours ago, Puckstopper said:

I was in high school/college when most of the pads we're bantering about were released.   I've personally owned Helite II's and Pro90z and can safely say that I regretted selling the II's to buy the 90z set, despite the fact that Pro90z's were my dream pad until I actually strapped them on.

Now, on to Velocity vs all other previous "box" pads:  People I  played with were aware of box pads like Vic and Aeroflex, but never bought them for one reason or another (availability, price, or just the fact that they "looked freaking weird").  Velocities on the other hand were light, sexy and revolutionary without being TOO revolutionary.  EVERYONE I knew wanted a pair and for a while there it seemed like if you weren't wearing Velo's you were wearing a clone from Simmons, Battram or someone else.  It is 100% fair to give the OG Velo line credit for pushing box style pads to the front of the discussion.

One humorous note:  As I thought back on it, Pete Smith has been involved in more pads that put performance ahead of appearance than any other designer I can think of.  I love the way my Warrior setups play, but I totally get why people struggle to get onboard with the look of the pads and gloves.  Maybe Pete deserves  a spot on the list for pioneering "function over form"?

There is not "right" in this discussion, as how we determine to give credit is a matter of opinion. Your thoughts perfectly sum up my feeling as well.

The note on Smith is actually fascinating when you think about what you said about the Velo. Where was Smith's biggest commercial success? When there was some Vaughn oversight dialing back his concepts. That's not to say that Pete is not making better products now, just sorta a fascinating thought.

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11 minutes ago, TheGoalNet said:

I'd love to pin this down, but super complicated to solve at the moment, haha

True! Here's the real answer IMHO... Win-lite surfaced in the NHL and retail in the late 80's. There was criticism that unlike deer hair stuffed pads the foam used by Win-lite gave off hot rebounds and that was considered bad. Fast forward just a bit and almost everyone was incorporating at least some foam in their pads as well as using synthetics like cordura to make pads lighter. I still think the Vaughn Legacy pad was the first traditional style foam stuffed pad to explode on the market. Of course there was also the Brown 280, DR quantum, Cooper GP-Pro and a bunch of others. All this happened within a very short period of time. These also happen to be all the pads I lusted for when I was in high school!!! Photo is from 1991, my 3rd season in Cooper GP-Pros. They were a bit ragged looking at this point. For obvious reasons this is my favorite era of goalie equipment!

IMG_5972.JPG

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5 minutes ago, Peanutbutterfly said:

True! Here's the real answer IMHO... Win-lite surfaced in the NHL and retail in the late 80's. There was criticism that unlike deer hair stuffed pads the foam used by Win-lite gave off hot rebounds and that was considered bad. Fast forward just a bit and almost everyone was incorporating at least some foam in their pads as well as using synthetics like cordura to make pads lighter. I still think the Vaughn Legacy pad was the first traditional style foam stuffed pad to explode on the market. Of course there was also the Brown 280, DR quantum, Cooper GP-Pro and a bunch of others. All this happened within a very short period of time. These also happen to be all the pads I lusted for when I was in high school!!! Photo is from 1991, my 3rd season in Cooper GP-Pros. They were a bit ragged looking at this point. For obvious reasons this is my favorite era of goalie equipment!

IMG_5972.JPG

I would tip my cap to the best selling version... Vaughn Legacy. That was one of the most popular lines in history.

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On 7/7/2020 at 7:49 PM, TheGoalNet said:

2.0...

Foam core pad: Heaton Helite II - Not the first, but the first commercially successful

Solid core pad - RBK Premier II

1 Piece glove - Reebok P3 popularized the discussion, but CCM blockade started the concept

This is Finnish Pallas from 1994. A bindingless blocker, one piece glove and soft foam pads. 

Which one was earlier Blockade or Sher-Wood 9990?

85623-6182969Fr.jpg

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Fun topic!

Big/modern blocker sidewall: Lefevre/Koho 530

Air knit finger sidewalls in the blocker: Lefevre/Koho 560

One piece knee block: Lefevre/Reebok Premier 1 (although this was on Koho pro pads earlier than that)

  • before this, multiple "wings" were common.

Knee block with stability bump: Lefevre/Reebok Premier 4?

Professor strap: Vaughn (c/o Ben Scrivens)

@TheGoalNet
I'd disagree on Solid Core Pad on Premier 2.  I think the Koho 500 was the first solid molded foam goal pad.
Also disagree on the Hard Rebounds off the blocker.  Vaughn Velocity line had a lexan sheet just under the jenpro layer.  Concept was the same, but limited by the technology at the time.

10 hours ago, TheGoalNet said:

I think this is Vaughn's own fault. Same as Vaughn used composite materials inside the pads before Bauer, but Bauer better understood how to explain the benefits of composites to goalie consumers.

IMO the difference is the framing of customer perception.  Vaughn said "hey we put composite in here" - hard stop.  Bauer said "hey we put composite in here to help you kick out rebounds farther"

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17 hours ago, Puckstopper said:

Now, on to Velocity vs all other previous "box" pads:  People I  played with were aware of box pads like Vic and Aeroflex, but never bought them for one reason or another (availability, price, or just the fact that they "looked freaking weird").  Velocities on the other hand were light, sexy and revolutionary without being TOO revolutionary.  EVERYONE I knew wanted a pair and for a while there it seemed like if you weren't wearing Velo's you were wearing a clone from Simmons, Battram or someone else.  It is 100% fair to give the OG Velo line credit for pushing box style pads to the front of the discussion.

YES!

Although I can't remember any names, I do remember seeing some fringe manufacturers putting their own spin on the Velocity to try to capitalize on the design - many of these companies at that point had either been out of the goalie game for a few years, or were traditionally more focused on player gear (Hespeler, Vic come to mind for some reason - not sure if they actually tried). 

EDIT:

Strangely enough, these just popped on my Facebook feed.  Definite Velo clone, right down to the graphic

image.png.cd00c3bfe35d244abb2407ffef8a3723.png

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