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So not sure if you guys are aware, but currently Vancouver has been under a lot of strain from the massive rainfall we have had. It rains a ton here, especially in November, but we have had a month worth of rain fall in the last two days. This isn't including the larger than average rainfall we've been experiencing since September.

As it stands all four highways out of Vancouver are shutdown due to flooding, mudslides, and/or washouts. Two of the highways are completely washed out in areas and will take months to rebuild.

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Railways are compromised and down.

Flood are occurring on highways within the great Vancouver area as well.

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There was one stretch of highway where we had to airlift people out as they were stranded between two mudslides.

 

Shit's fucked yo.

 

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Here's an image that gives a better perspective of where all of these issues are occurring. Keep in mind it doesn't showcase the brown water flood images above that are between the two blue dots of 'Sumas Flooding' and 'Aggasiz Flooding'

Vancouver is one of two major ports for the entire west coast of Canada. Safe to say that there will be massive supply chain issues that are going to start ramping up quickly.

 

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Edited by coopaloop1234
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5 minutes ago, Naz said:

Stay safe @coopaloop1234  I drove down from Nanaimo to Victoria Sunday afternoon/ evening.  I was going 40km/h the whole way.  One of the worst drives of my life.

You too man. Was originally planning on heading up to the Pemberton area for a camping trip this weekend but we're thinking it'll be best to postpone it for a bit till thins settle down.

Edited by coopaloop1234
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6 hours ago, coopaloop1234 said:

Here's an image that gives a better perspective of where all of these issues are occurring. Keep in mind it doesn't showcase the brown water flood images above that are between the two blue dots of 'Sumas Flooding' and 'Aggasiz Flooding'

Vancouver is one of two major ports for the entire west coast of Canada. Safe to say that there will be massive supply chain issues that are going to start ramping up quickly.

 

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Gonna be a lot of bonded loads going through the US. 

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Video shows the aftermath of one of the routes that's been washed away. In the video you can see the Trans Mountain Pipeline floating.

This pipeline supplies the est coast with approximately 80% of it's crude oil from Alberta. It's been shut off since these slides happened, but there is a pending supply issue of fuel that will manifest itself soon.

 

Edited by coopaloop1234
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9 hours ago, Scythe said:

Read an article about a team going back to Quebec or Hamilton and that the Coyotes are on the chopping block.  It's surprising they have lasted as long as they have. There use to be a member on GSBB that lived there and had more insight on the team. 

With Bettman being the commissioner I don't see Quebec City or Canada for that matter getting a new team any time soon. I keep heating Houston or Kansas City as the next destination of a relocation should a team get tossed out of their arena. The Coyotes have the new arena being built in Tempe so as much as I'd love to see more teams back in Canada I'm not too thrilled about the chances. 

I do know that the governor of Quebec really wants a team back though so who knows. Money talks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Why do today's goaltenders snap their trappers downwards when snagging a puck? Doesn't this motion increase the chance of the puck landing at their feet? 

I see this motion everywhere, the pros, Juniors  and even minor hockey at the older levels. I realize that catching gloves are now held upright rather than a more sideways angle that we used back then. You must be damn sure that the puck won't pop out as you snap that glove straight at the ice by your feet.

Please enlighten this veteran 'tendy but resist the temptation to comment about old guys keeping it up.

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6 hours ago, Wonder35 said:

Why do today's goaltenders snap their trappers downwards when snagging a puck? Doesn't this motion increase the chance of the puck landing at their feet? 

I see this motion everywhere, the pros, Juniors  and even minor hockey at the older levels. I realize that catching gloves are now held upright rather than a more sideways angle that we used back then. You must be damn sure that the puck won't pop out as you snap that glove straight at the ice by your feet.

Please enlighten this veteran 'tendy but resist the temptation to comment about old guys keeping it up.

I don’t get it.

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10 minutes ago, bunnyman666 said:

I don’t get it.

You don't get my question or are also puzzled by the tendency to glove a shot and quickly snap the trapper in a downward motion?

We had a discussion about this in our dressing room today. A few of my team mates also attend a lot of junior games (Kelowna Rockets/WHL and West Kelowna Warriors/BCHL). One of them started this conversation and expected me to know the reasoning. I don't.

Anyone?

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19 minutes ago, Wonder35 said:

You don't get my question or are also puzzled by the tendency to glove a shot and quickly snap the trapper in a downward motion?

We had a discussion about this in our dressing room today. A few of my team mates also attend a lot of junior games (Kelowna Rockets/WHL and West Kelowna Warriors/BCHL). One of them started this conversation and expected me to know the reasoning. I don't.

Anyone?

I get your question; I don’t get arbitrarily letting out the puck :)

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Let me try this once more. It's not that we see goalies throwing the pack onto the ice but rather the motion. From a 12 o'clock trapper positioning (routine stance these days) there is a strong tendency to aggressively attack the puck and continue in the same downward motion. Perhaps this is preferred to holding the puck where its caught.

This typically occurs in chest to shoulder high shots.

Look folks, this isn't a life or death type of question, just something I have noticed occurring more and more. When one of my defensemen happened to query me today (a defensemen?) I had no answer ................... crickets.

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1 hour ago, Wonder35 said:

Let me try this once more. It's not that we see goalies throwing the pack onto the ice but rather the motion. From a 12 o'clock trapper positioning (routine stance these days) there is a strong tendency to aggressively attack the puck and continue in the same downward motion. Perhaps this is preferred to holding the puck where its caught.

This typically occurs in chest to shoulder high shots.

Look folks, this isn't a life or death type of question, just something I have noticed occurring more and more. When one of my defensemen happened to query me today (a defensemen?) I had no answer ................... crickets.

I put the puck toward my chest in that scenario. I don’t want it getting out.

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14 hours ago, Wonder35 said:

Let me try this once more. It's not that we see goalies throwing the pack onto the ice but rather the motion. From a 12 o'clock trapper positioning (routine stance these days) there is a strong tendency to aggressively attack the puck and continue in the same downward motion. Perhaps this is preferred to holding the puck where its caught.

This typically occurs in chest to shoulder high shots.

Look folks, this isn't a life or death type of question, just something I have noticed occurring more and more. When one of my defensemen happened to query me today (a defensemen?) I had no answer ................... crickets.

FWIW, I was being taught in 1998 to snap the glove forward when the glove hit my T to eliminate popouts. 

"Attacking the puck" has been a pretty big recent change in goalie philosophy and coaching these last couple years and IMO has a role in this trend coming back.  Glove and body positioning is more aggressive. 

In the past, an ideal butterfly would mean the goalie is perfectly straight from knees to shoulders and glove positioning was much more passive than what we see today.
These days, goalies are taught to have a little bit of forward lean at the waist to eliminate vertical angle and gloves are aggressively forward to reduce net availability overall.  Principles like head trajectory encourage the goalie to keep "nose on puck" to aid with tracking, which in turn encourages proper body mechanics. 

In pictures - notice how Roy is more or less completely vertical, and Price uses his shoulders to crest over the puck and gloves to surround it.

tldr; Since the vast majority of shots are released from ice level, it makes sense to snap the glove forward as you are maintaining coverage and catching surface usage.  In a scenario where the goalie allows the shot velocity to snap the glove back, a pop out could be potentially devastating as it goes above or behind the goalie's sight line.   Most saves in the modern game are made with at least one knee on the ice, so a mistimed forward snap is not as bad since the goalie is probably already down and can stuff or smother it.

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3 hours ago, Chenner29 said:

FWIW, I was being taught in 1998 to snap the glove forward when the glove hit my T to eliminate popouts. 

"Attacking the puck" has been a pretty big recent change in goalie philosophy and coaching these last couple years and IMO has a role in this trend coming back.  Glove and body positioning is more aggressive. 

In the past, an ideal butterfly would mean the goalie is perfectly straight from knees to shoulders and glove positioning was much more passive than what we see today.
These days, goalies are taught to have a little bit of forward lean at the waist to eliminate vertical angle and gloves are aggressively forward to reduce net availability overall.  Principles like head trajectory encourage the goalie to keep "nose on puck" to aid with tracking, which in turn encourages proper body mechanics. 

In pictures - notice how Roy is more or less completely vertical, and Price uses his shoulders to crest over the puck and gloves to surround it.

tldr; Since the vast majority of shots are released from ice level, it makes sense to snap the glove forward as you are maintaining coverage and catching surface usage.  In a scenario where the goalie allows the shot velocity to snap the glove back, a pop out could be potentially devastating as it goes above or behind the goalie's sight line.   Most saves in the modern game are made with at least one knee on the ice, so a mistimed forward snap is not as bad since the goalie is probably already down and can stuff or smother it.

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Logical, especially the comment that most glove saves are made with one knee already on the ice. Attack the puck is what I am seeing.

For a stand up style, I don't know that mine can be classified as Hybrid, it typically meant that my trapper was straight up for a high hard one, horizontal for a waist high and 6 o'clock for a low shot as we waited for the puck and sometimes even collapsed the trapper backwards to absorb the puck, avoiding pop outs.

Thanks Chenner, interesting analysis. 

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