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Positioning Tips, Tricks, etc.


estogoalie
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I played at a rink a few weeks ago where the crease paint was barely visible, and it really threw my positioning off. I didn't realize how "addicted to the paint" I had become. I'd been getting lazy, I would normally hang around the top of the crease, just enough to be able to look down and see where I am by the crease paint, and move around based on that. It was actually working quite well for a while. Until the paint wasn't visible, and then my autopilot was gone and I forgot how to fly manually.

Since then, I'm reverting to the default position of sitting in the middle of the goal line, and moving up from there. As well as tapping the goal-posts alot more again. I still think the crease paint is a valuable aid for positioning, altho I recall some goalie coaches saying not to do that (forgot the reason?). 

Anyway, just curious to get some feedback, and hear what's the "correct" way to keep positioning, and any tips, tricks, etc.

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Per Pasco Valana,

image.png.ca9c047773870487a4e86e8b539e2d15.png

4 minutes ago, estogoalie said:

Since then, I'm reverting to the default position of sitting in the middle of the goal line, and moving up from there. As well as tapping the goal-posts alot more again. I still think the crease paint is a valuable aid for positioning, altho I recall some goalie coaches saying not to do that (forgot the reason?). 

If you're playing on different ice surfaces, there's certain on ice markers which may be different from sheet to sheet  (hash marks, face off dots etc).  The crease is almost always the same, outside of international (full semicircle) vs NHL style crease (used in the picture).  Not sure if you're juxtaposing the two ideas?

For me,  the two most important points are the 45* angles set by the right angle marker in the crease.  It looks like an arrow pointing at the faceoff dot.  When I'm centered on that, I know I'm covering the angle at the dot and I can build my reference points from there, doesn't matter where I'm playing.

Assuming play is developing on my R side

Centered on arrow puts me on the faceoff dot
A step towards center with R foot on the arrow lines me up to the point shot from where the boards meet the blue line
A step towards goal line with L foot on arrow puts me on the dead angle (between faceoff dot and bottom of circle)
Once puck goes below bottom of circle I'm on my post

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It's not always even the paint. How rinks are typically laid out can make a massive difference in the subconscious clues we absorb to understand our positioning. We take in so much information such as blue line location, face off circles, hash marks, etc. that help us determine our positioning along side the blue paint.

For an example, every now and then I'll play on 3v3 rinks and my god I don't have a clue to where I am because of the skewed dimensions. The typical formation of lining yourself up with the face off dot and corner of the crease doesn't work because somehow it puts you so off angle you look like it's your first time playing hockey. I play a far more deep and reserved game. Though, with the constant barrage of shots and skating, sitting back and relying on reflexes is less tiring and welcome.

In a less egregious example, there's another rink I'll play at that's just slightly smaller than a standard NA ice rink, like we're talking 185' x 75'. Not immediately apparent to the naked eye, but once you start moving around, you notice everything just feels slightly off. The adjustment to this ice is a lot faster, usually by the end of warm ups, but it makes you more conscious of learning new 'landmarks' to determine your positioning.

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13 minutes ago, Chenner29 said:

For me,  the two most important points are the 45* angles set by the right angle marker in the crease.  It looks like an arrow pointing at the faceoff dot.  When I'm centered on that, I know I'm covering the angle at the dot and I can build my reference points from there, doesn't matter where I'm playing.

Yea, lining up the cease corners with the faceoff dots is crucial. And I was having trouble with that on that ice with the barely visible crease paint.

 

13 minutes ago, coopaloop1234 said:

For an example, every now and then I'll play on 3v3 rinks and my god I don't have a clue to where I am because of the skewed dimensions. T

Yea, sometimes towards the end of training we'll play "bogo-bogo" (Swiss players will know ;) )where we take the 2 goals and put them on the short sides of the ice (like little kids sometimes play) and play 3-on-3. Your positioning is completely wiped out. And with the faster play and shorter ice, you have to just play deep in net anyway. But that's not a normal thing. Altho interesting/strange as a goalie to have to see how it feels to have all landmarks gone.

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  • 2 months later...
On 12/9/2021 at 9:41 PM, dreadlocked1 said:

No paint marks or visual cues anywhere anymore for me since I started tapping off on both sides constantly.  I find my playing consistent between at least 3 different rinks.

On 12/10/2021 at 3:17 AM, WillyGrips13 said:

I too stay on the goal line in the center of the net and tap the posts with my stick and glove before moving to address the puck. I can’t say I think about the crease or rink landmarks much at least not consciously. 

Same.  I always stay on my goal line center crease when play isn't in my zone.  I always tap off the posts as play is coming at me.  Constantly checking again as I back in closer.  

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If asked, I tell newer goalies to act like a roomba.  Always go back to your home.  And there will be times you suck.

3 hours ago, SaveByRichter35 said:

Same.  I always stay on my goal line center crease when play isn't in my zone.  I always tap off the posts as play is coming at me.  Constantly checking again as I back in closer.  

 

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