Jump to content

DIY Glove Break In Machine


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Ok, this is going to be one of the more ridiculous posts I’ll ever make, but thought I would share this idea with you all in the hopes that someone will have suggestions for improvements or make a better version.

I pieced together a DIY glove break in machine (heavily inspired by the Brian’s machine posted below) using home workshop stuff. My best and easiest solution for producing the linear motion necessary was to use a cheap variable-speed jigsaw I had lying around and attach an inexpensive ball access (available on Amazon, purportedly for turning a jigsaw into a percussive muscle massager). 

Clamped an aluminum tube across the break, clamped everything else together the best I could using the table from my drill press and this is the result:

 

Obvious I realize this isn’t a lot of travel, so I’m not sure how effective it will be. Hoping that if I run it for a few hours I’ll see some results. Planning to heat up the glove in the oven first.

I also think it will be more effective if I stabilize the back side of the glove more. Working on a solution for that.

Here is the Brian’s machine I referenced:

 

 

Thanks in advance for any thoughts/ideas!

Edited by Punisher Goalie
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, ilyazhito said:

That is an interesting device. How does it work? Hopefully you'll be able to break in your glove well. 

In theory, it works by compressing the glove around the pipe at the break, simulating closing the glove over and over. I’m just not convinced that my set up, with the limited linear travel of the arm - I.e. the amount the machine pushes the glove closed - and the wobbliness of the backside of the glove, is really going to achieve much. I’m going to heat it up and let it run for an hour today and see. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could build a link or joint (what ever it is called) to extend the range of movement. That would reguire a bit slower motor rpm everything stays in control.

I don't know how useful this type of machining is afterall as most of the stiffness is from the T (plastics inside) where it connects to thumb and finger parts of the glove.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...