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Butterfly during scrambles


Quadzilla32
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Hey guys,

I'm just getting back into league play after being out for four years and noticing an issue. During scrambles or rebounds I notice if I am pushing left or right I tend to bring my legs straight behind me instead of leaving them flared out. Best way to describe  it would be I will drop into BF and then to push side to side, my legs pull in and the face of my pads are facing the posts. This causes issues because I can’t slide that well and if there is a quick second shot I can’t flare my legs out quick enough and giving up easy goals. 

I do have a rather narrow BF and have to really focus on closing my five hole while flaring my legs. I’m starting a flexibility routine to try and help my mobility in my hips so hopefully that helps. Any suggestions would be awesome! 

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Butterfly sliding is a pretty dynamic maneuver. My goalie coach emphasized that it involves many parts of your body that aren't obvious. 

One thing to work on in terms of improving the basic mechanics is first engaging your head and hands.

Say you're in a symmetrical butterfly and centered at the top of the crease and you want to slide left to right to the post.

1. Turn your head right and lock you eyes at the post, your target.

2. Turn your shoulders right and lead with your hands on the right of your body towards your target. 

3. Load your left foot and lock your blade into pushing position with your leg just short of perpendicular. 

4. As you push, extend your right foot and "flare" your right leg.

5. Push hard and focus on your weight distribution to reduce any dragging as much as you can.

So now that it's broken down into individual segments,  you can practice each one step by step individually and in sequence. 

Oh....and sharper skates help.  After goalie camp and working with a pro coach I went from a 1/2 to 7/16 and it made executing this sequence so much easier with more power. 

Edited by seagoal
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1 hour ago, seagoal said:

Butterfly sliding is a pretty dynamic maneuver. My goalie coach emphasized that it involves many parts of your body that aren't obvious. 

One thing to work on in terms of improving the basic mechanics is first engaging your head and hands.

Say you're in a symmetrical butterfly and centered at the top of the crease and you want to slide left to right to the post.

1. Turn your head right and lock you eyes at the post, your target.

2. Turn your shoulders right and lead with your hands on the right of your body towards your target. 

3. Load your left foot and lock your blade into pushing position with your leg just short of perpendicular. 

4. As you push, extend your right foot and "flare" your right leg.

5. Push hard and focus on your weight distribution to reduce any dragging as much as you can.

So now that it's broken down into individual segments,  you can practice each one step by step individually and in sequence. 

Oh....and sharper skates help.  After goalie camp and working with a pro coach I went from a 1/2 to 7/16 and it made executing this sequence so much easier with more power. 

Awesome thanks for the break down. I have to learn to lead with my hands and head more. I also find muself not staying centered and leaning one way more than the other in certain situations. Which leads to bad goals that would be easily stopped if I just centered myself. I think it’s just lack of drilling over and over,I know exactly what I did wrong after the play and it frustrating. Just need to get the muscle memory down.

I usually have my skates  sharpened to 7/16 and found this helps a lot with pushing and wider stances.

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6 minutes ago, Quadzilla32 said:

Awesome thanks for the break down. I have to learn to lead with my hands and head more. I also find muself not staying centered and leaning one way more than the other in certain situations. Which leads to bad goals that would be easily stopped if I just centered myself. I think it’s just lack of drilling over and over,I know exactly what I did wrong after the play and it frustrating. Just need to get the muscle memory down.

I usually have my skates  sharpened to 7/16 and found this helps a lot with pushing and wider stances.

Yeah, leaning in the wrong situation is tough because it can create drag in one direction if you need to go the opposite or get you cheating on one side too much. 

I do lots of positive self-talk constantly when playing and one of my regular lines is " stay symmetrical,  stay upright as much as possible." 

Staying in a neutral position allows you to maximize power and mobility when making split second choices. 

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12 hours ago, seagoal said:

Yeah, leaning in the wrong situation is tough because it can create drag in one direction if you need to go the opposite or get you cheating on one side too much. 

I do lots of positive self-talk constantly when playing and one of my regular lines is " stay symmetrical,  stay upright as much as possible." 

Staying in a neutral position allows you to maximize power and mobility when making split second choices. 

I’m hoping that getting back into play  a couple times a week will get my muscle memory back. It’s just frustrating jumping back in to a level I usually played at and getting embarrassed. 

 I’m starting to really focus on keeping my hands out in front of me and tracking the puck and staying square. Also watching the puck come all the way into me and tracking rebounds. I found myself just seeing the shot and dropping into a BF and hoping that the puck would hit me and occasionally 

I tend to offer myself “constructive criticism”    

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2 hours ago, Quadzilla32 said:

I’m hoping that getting back into play  a couple times a week will get my muscle memory back. It’s just frustrating jumping back in to a level I usually played at and getting embarrassed. 

 I’m starting to really focus on keeping my hands out in front of me and tracking the puck and staying square. Also watching the puck come all the way into me and tracking rebounds. I found myself just seeing the shot and dropping into a BF and hoping that the puck would hit me and occasionally 

I tend to offer myself “constructive criticism”    

All those things are very good to focus on.  Another self-talk thing I tell myself is "active hands out in front."

I want to be catching pucks in front of my body rather than beside my body as much as I can.  Plus gloves closer to pucks take up more space than gloves further from pucks.  It's just good physics. 

Great plan for rebounds and tracking.  I think that's where we can really start to dictate how a game plays out.

There was a pro goalie coach on a video recently who said, paraphrasing: " all good goalies can stop pucks, it's not that difficult. But only great goalies can control pucks." 

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