Jump to content

What's required for coaching goalies privately? (insurance)


WillyGrips13

Recommended Posts

I've been coaching the goalies in the local youth and high school program. Although, I live in Memphis, Tennessee, the rink these programs are based out of is in Mississippi. It's the only rink in the region. To coach them during USA Hockey practices, I needed to get a background check, be a USA Hockey member, take a SafeSport course and go through a level one USA Hockey Coaches course. But to coach a goalie separately, it would be at a stick & puck where I'd carve out a piece of the ice for me and the goalie. But since that isn't part of a USA Hockey practice, I've been told by other private coaches I'd need liability insurance.

Have any of you guys, particularly those in the US, dealt with this and what have you had to sign up for? This, like most things in the adult world, is proving to be way more complicated and costly than I expected.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, WillyGrips13 said:

I've been coaching the goalies in the local youth and high school program. Although, I live in Memphis, Tennessee, the rink these programs are based out of is in Mississippi. It's the only rink in the region. To coach them during USA Hockey practices, I needed to get a background check, be a USA Hockey member, take a SafeSport course and go through a level one USA Hockey Coaches course. But to coach a goalie separately, it would be at a stick & puck where I'd carve out a piece of the ice for me and the goalie. But since that isn't part of a USA Hockey practice, I've been told by other private coaches I'd need liability insurance.

Have any of you guys, particularly those in the US, dealt with this and what have you had to sign up for? This, like most things in the adult world, is proving to be way more complicated and costly than I expected.

Sounds weird to me.

I coached high school roller hockey from 2003-2006ish.  I had to get fingerprinted, background checked, and register as a coach on USA Hockey. 

I've talked to a couple of my buddies who are skills coaches that operate similar to what you're looking at (sticktimes/stick&pucks) and they didn't need to pick up any liability insurance.  The rink I've been skating at doesn't check - I could probably coach a session tomorrow if I wanted to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm right across the border from you (Alabama) and what your talking about is what I ran into. When they told me I had to go get something else, ANOTHER certificate, I just said no. I already had (at the time) usa hockey level 2, goal tending bronze (another usa hockey coaching program level courses), safesport, concussion protocol, background,  and age group specific modules. I'll coach during practices and clinics. I'm not seeking private insurance for the amount they were asking (was over $1500.00 that I would have to pay).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've done private coaching where I was either invited by a team in one of the hockey associations and asked to work with their goalie(s)for a session or more, and I also have worked 1 on 1 with an adult goalie whom rented his own ice time. I've never had to or was asked to get some kind of insurance. I have considered it for doing camps (multiple days and goalie groups) but simply trying to find a source that offers such a service was next to impossible. 

Of course, if I was working through/under an organization or minor hockey league club or provincial federation be it on Quebec or Ontario side, I'm assuming insurance is provided by said parties. 

I too got my certificate similar to your SafeSport through Hockey Canada, but for anything else directly related to the coaching of goalies, it seems like you have to jump through hoops and I never was able to get clear answers to how to get things rolling. I basically gave up on them. I figured that my 30+years of playing and my 10+ years of coaching is experience enough to justify the means. I get plenty of tips and information from well established professional coaches when I hit a bump in the road.

I understand why Hockey Canada/U.S.A. are doing all that, to make sure kids aren't going through uncle Bob who maybe played 1 season when he was 12 back in the 60s-70s or team coaches that know dick about goaltending. God forbid kids today would go through the same self-learning curve we had to with zero coaches available when we were young.

If you can get away with a simple liability waiver form, I'd give that a shot. If not, maybe try to get affiliated with a local organization or federation or even a goalie/hockey school. Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/10/2021 at 7:59 PM, RichMan said:

I understand why Hockey Canada/U.S.A. are doing all that, to make sure kids aren't going through uncle Bob who maybe played 1 season when he was 12 back in the 60s-70s or team coaches that know dick about goaltending. God forbid kids today would go through the same self-learning curve we had to with zero coaches available when we were young.

I'm confused with this comment. Are you saying someone who gets their general coaching certificate ore whatever it's called now automatically knows enough to coach goalies? I've seen a lot of coaches today who must have whatever certification is required to be on the ice and in a change room with the team who never run one targeted or otherwise useful drill for a goalie in a 60-minute session...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Colander said:

I'm confused with this comment. Are you saying someone who gets their general coaching certificate ore whatever it's called now automatically knows enough to coach goalies? I've seen a lot of coaches today who must have whatever certification is required to be on the ice and in a change room with the team who never run one targeted or otherwise useful drill for a goalie in a 60-minute session...

 

Ok, with provincial federations, for anyone to coach a team, regardless if they have lots or some or little or no hockey experience, they must take some coaching education programs to initiate them to coaching hockey or simply (in the more experienced people) give them certified permission to coach at level mites or atoms and so on.

As for goalie coaching, the format is different and can be confusing. Take into consideration that I haven't looked into their certification programs for some years. 

Then you have guys like me who have enough personal hockey experience to be considered for either private coaching or get hired by a hockey school.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Take into account that I can only speak into US policy as that's where I am at and all that I know.

Coaching a team or a goalie during a team practice is COMPLETELY different than 1on1 private coaching.

USA hockey started a few years ago with a goalie specific USA hockey trained certification. It is a course designed to teach coaches on how to coach goalies ONLY. There are 3 levels to it: Bronze, Silver, and Gold. It still requires you to have, at minimum, a level 1 USA hockey coaching certification. Here is a link so you can get the idea: https://www.usahockey.com/goaltendingcoachdevelopment

To touch on what @Colander is saying, NO, it does not make you know enough to coach goalies just by getting your general, level 1 coaching certificate. That, sadly, is how things were done in the past. "Oh, your a coach, then you know how to coach everyone in everything". That, under USA hockey, does not fly any more. They have (finally) come to realize that we need people to coach goalies who actually know what the hell they are talking about. So they (USA hockey) have made programs to teach coaches how to work with goalies. I have personally gone through the goalie specific training (still have to do Gold, but got a pass this year because of Covid) and can honestly say they DO make a difference. While at the Bronze level, it was super basic and was everything I was already doing, Silver level really added so much more to my skills as a coach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, loki1416 said:

Take into account that I can only speak into US policy as that's where I am at and all that I know.

Coaching a team or a goalie during a team practice is COMPLETELY different than 1on1 private coaching.

USA hockey started a few years ago with a goalie specific USA hockey trained certification. It is a course designed to teach coaches on how to coach goalies ONLY. There are 3 levels to it: Bronze, Silver, and Gold. It still requires you to have, at minimum, a level 1 USA hockey coaching certification. Here is a link so you can get the idea: https://www.usahockey.com/goaltendingcoachdevelopment

To touch on what @Colander is saying, NO, it does not make you know enough to coach goalies just by getting your general, level 1 coaching certificate. That, sadly, is how things were done in the past. "Oh, your a coach, then you know how to coach everyone in everything". That, under USA hockey, does not fly any more. They have (finally) come to realize that we need people to coach goalies who actually know what the hell they are talking about. So they (USA hockey) have made programs to teach coaches how to work with goalies. I have personally gone through the goalie specific training (still have to do Gold, but got a pass this year because of Covid) and can honestly say they DO make a difference. While at the Bronze level, it was super basic and was everything I was already doing, Silver level really added so much more to my skills as a coach.

You can thank guys like Justin Goldman for this. Our Canadian version was overlooked by Sean Burke and Larry Sadler to name a few.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@RichMan I'm curious on how your cannaddada version was over looked. And would especially like to know why you named the two names that you named as being a part of that. Is there an article you can link? Anything where I can read up on this? (Note: This is for personal edification only, as I just want to know whats/hows)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, loki1416 said:

@RichMan I'm curious on how your cannaddada version was over looked. And would especially like to know why you named the two names that you named as being a part of that. Is there an article you can link? Anything where I can read up on this? (Note: This is for personal edification only, as I just want to know whats/hows)

I know the men that were responsible for putting the program together by digging for info, calling Hockey Canada, asking contacts in the coaching industry when I was looking to get Hockey Canada certified.

As for links, you can simply go through www.hockeycanada.ca and dig up info on their coaching programs and specifically that for goaltending. I'm sure they've upgraded their programming since my last inquiries some 5 years ago. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...