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Stopping "Tweener" Shots


ilyazhito
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As I've been playing more and more, I've noticed that it's relatively easy to.save both the high and low shots. Low shots either hit the pads or can be played.with the stick. High shots I can catch with the glove or bat with the blocker. However, shots between my blocker and pads or glove and pads are tricky to play. What are some tips for stopping the tweener shots?

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1 hour ago, ilyazhito said:

As I've been playing more and more, I've noticed that it's relatively easy to.save both the high and low shots. Low shots either hit the pads or can be played.with the stick. High shots I can catch with the glove or bat with the blocker. However, shots between my blocker and pads or glove and pads are tricky to play. What are some tips for stopping the tweener shots?

I am in no way a good goalie on ice. But I've played player for 30+ years. I find it's all about anticipating the shots coming and when I can I go a lot lower in my stance to keel low pucks out. 

I've also played ball hockey goalie for my whole life so I'm not a butterfly guy normally and that's why I play more of a hybrid style. 

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8 hours ago, Maxpower29 said:

I am in no way a good goalie on ice. But I've played player for 30+ years. I find it's all about anticipating the shots coming and when I can I go a lot lower in my stance to keel low pucks out. 

I've also played ball hockey goalie for my whole life so I'm not a butterfly guy normally and that's why I play more of a hybrid style. 

I'll try that out. Maybe the lower stance will shorten my time until I drop and eliminate the tweener shots. 

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There’s a plenty of variables at play depending where the puck, the shooter, and yourself are. Is there traffic or is it clear sighted etc.

But let’s say you are set, centred, and square to the puck. Your hands are projected forward and it is a clear sighted shot. The the shooter is coming toward you as opposed to dragging laterally. 
 

There’s a lot of talk of “tracking pucks all the way.” Following the puck with your whole head all the way to hands, pad, or body. As shooters get closer the ability track becomes nearly impossible, so you must focus on picking the puck up off the blade and “reading the release.” 

Remember there is only so much room for the puck to get past you as highlighted in the photo below. You’re not getting “beat” over the shoulder as much as you are being beaten outside your body/hands. The puck for the most part is on a trajectory where it is rising, and pucks highest point will be where it hits the back of the net.

Where a lot goalies get in trouble is by over reaching and opening new holes on these 12”-14” inch shots. Or goalies do to little and default to a blocking butterfly with the hands low on the hips.

If you are good position to read the release, you can start to push your hands into the shooting lanes before the puck is released. This sort of educated guessing and anticipating comes with repeated practice.
 

Long story short keep your hands in front of your body, get them in the shooting lane and keep them there off the release. 

 

 

 

D82B8EF6-DD9A-49B5-88FA-6712C8EA9FD7.jpeg

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In the picture I'd say the catcher is pretty much on the point covering most of that side and high enough. Gravity helps to bring it down when the shot is going low on that side.

The blocker isn't really where you would want it to be. It's tied to the body and not in a position to move anywhere. I'd like it to be more forward and more in angle against the shot. Not 90 degree angle but maybe 75 degree and covering the corner of the beige sticks. And while there once again getting the gain from the gravity to move down if needed.

I wouldn't mind the stick blade in this situation at all as you have your pads blocking the ice and directing the puck to corners.

Personally I've had most problems with my blocker being out of place and mostly as in the picture leaning to my body or pad and from there I've never been able to move it out to make a save. And when I've been able to hold my blocker out in position to cover the side and ready to move more freely I've made easy saves with puck deflected nice and easy towards corner.

It's kind of annoying how easy it is when it's done right and how difficult when there is a small flaw included.

One could compare this to player scoring or not. You just have to be in the right spot and have your blade ready for the puck and it's easy to score while another day it won't work no matter how you try.

Edited by ArdeFIN
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I agree the photo I posted above blocker position isn’t great, it was more to highlight the space where pucks can beat a goalie. I think the photo I posted now will better highlight what I mean about getting the hands in the shooting lane. 

43F575D6-2B2D-45CF-A662-2323F859D749.jpeg

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16 minutes ago, ilyazhito said:

That makes more sense. If I project the hands forward before or as I go down, there will be less space for the tweener shots to come.

Yep. This is a major fundamental concept that I don't think gets enough attention in Beer League. It's called Active Hands. Gloves should be out and up. Elbows in to prevent armpit shots. Your gloves should be actively tracking the shooters angle in three dimensions. It's not enough to just have your gloves out either, they should be "aiming" at the shot to present the post coverage to the puck. If it's in tight and low, gloves should be angled down at the puck and hands should be lower. From the puck's perspective, this cuts a lot of both the top and the underneath angles. If the shot is presenting further out, arms should also be extended out (not to full lock, just more forward) and up. When the shot comes, you should be attempting to "meet" the shot with your glove in the forward (Z) dimension, not passively trying to intercept the puck on the X-Y plane.

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