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IPv6Freely

IPv6Freely's Never-Ending Season

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2 minutes ago, Fullright said:

Good job in both IPv. Good to see you back at it after the injury.

Thanks! It's really like it never happened at this point. 

It's been a rough season. I'm 1-7-1 so far. I've had a couple bad games (one where I for some reason couldn't catch the puck, like my timing was totally off) but we've also had 5-7 skaters every game so that hasn't helped. 

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2 minutes ago, Hockey School Dropout said:

Good to see you back.  Have no fear, you'll come back around.  I was off for only a few months, and it still took twice that long to get back up to a level I found acceptable.

Well it's been a year since I started playing again so there's not much excuse at this point ;) haha

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Something you might want to watch out for: in the first video around 3:15-3:25 the puck trickles in at you along the ice and you pounce with your glove.  Try and stop that with your paddle down first and then cover it with your glove.  Less chance of it sliding under and past you. :)

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24 minutes ago, Hockey School Dropout said:

Something you might want to watch out for: in the first video around 3:15-3:25 the puck trickles in at you along the ice and you pounce with your glove.  Try and stop that with your paddle down first and then cover it with your glove.  Less chance of it sliding under and past you. :)

Do you mean 3:40? I agree with you, I was just 100% expecting a shot there!

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Looked good man! That game with the deer looked like it was getting a little punchy. #4 gave you a shot for what Seemed like no reason. I thought you played a good game and were also good in the shoot out.

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48 minutes ago, Imperative said:

Looked good man! That game with the deer looked like it was getting a little punchy. #4 gave you a shot for what Seemed like no reason. I thought you played a good game and were also good in the shoot out.

I have absolutely no idea what he was doing there! lol

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Can anyone see anything obvious I’m doing wrong here? This season is getting a bit ridiculous. I’m now 1-7-2 for the season. I’m sure it’s not all me, but I definitely feel like I’m letting my teammates down. 

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There's nothing wrong with your play. In other words, you're not losing because of your play. Sometimes things just don't go your way and the only thing to do is keep plugging away. So don't let doubt creep into your head or you will end up costing your team. To be honest, given your injury, you're playing remarkably well. 

Technical stuff. You are still way dominant on your right leg in that you go down on your right leg and your left leg gets extended. Take a look at the shootouts or breakaways. Almost any deke where the skater tries to put it in to your left will beat you. Your balance is also a little too far forward onto your toes. On some scrambles you end up on your belly. Not the ones where end up on your belly freezing the puck but ones where you end up falling forward some and the puck beats you. Easy fix: work on your skating some and keep your balance on the balls of your feet. Getting your skating a little better will help with those things and also help you will your rebound control. My guess is that you are suffering from a little bit of public skate syndrome: really good on one set of edges and not as good on the other ones. Don't let this rough patch bother you; you're playing fine.

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In my opininon, goal in the end of the game was BIG defence falut. They must try freeze that puck at faceoff, even in case of another faceoff. They just can´t let them win it clearly. It is obvious that player goes to faceoff very easy, didn´t hlod his stick properly. But if that even happens, there is no way that oposing player can stay infront of the net! Players no. 28 and 16 don´t have any oposing player even in the faceoff (!), no. 14 is behind play at the start... Clearly not your falut. btw. your defence does that a lot - oposing player in slot and they are just watching (don´t worry, my defence does that too).

I don´t see any bad goals on your video, just a lot of good saves.  

One thing to shutouts - it seems to me that you were tired, becouse you don´t skate with player well. You don´t match his speed and stop realy qiuck & go to the right side, but he just not even move his stick. Should have a lot of patience here, make him do the move and then be agresive with your save.

Edited by mik

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I noticed what Mik observed on the shootout as well: You are essentially standing still as the player breaks in (I know I just made this exact comment to someone else the other day, but…) Trying to stop a forward rushing in with speed while standing still requires almost superhuman reflexes.

Have a look at this clip: specific to this conversation is the glide back section, but as the saying goes, it’s all good!

 

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8 hours ago, Ghostender said:

I noticed what Mik observed on the shootout as well: You are essentially standing still as the player breaks in (I know I just made this exact comment to someone else the other day, but…) Trying to stop a forward rushing in with speed while standing still requires almost superhuman reflexes.

Have a look at this clip: specific to this conversation is the glide back section, but as the saying goes, it’s all good!

I actually bought that guys entire series :)

The problem for me with that video above is the "execute a powerful slide" part is something I'm unable to do. If I'm going left to right, no problem. If I have to go right to left, I'm dead in the water. This is not unique to my goaltending. From a standing position with a shoulder width wide stance in street clothes, dropping my left knee down first is... well, I have to REALLY force myself to do it.

When ON the ice, if I push and slide from a standing position into a butterfly left to right I'm good. If I try to do it right to left, I almost break my left ankle and end up putting the right knee down first anyway. I don't know why. If I try to do it slowly and consciously, it's even worse! I'll get video of it the next time I play pickup. 

That would explain why I get up with my left leg first, always. Again, not unique to on the ice, either. In street clothes, getting up with my right leg first is REALLY awkward and challenging. 

I also can't push right to left if I'm already in my butterfly. I can't get good contact with my blade on the ice. 

This entire issue with being one side dominant is probably my biggest hurdle and the number one thing keeping me from improving. 

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Look, you're being a little hard on yourself. It is nothing more than reps. There's nothing anatomically different between your right and left legs...I think, not having met you in person. Even if awkwardly, practice it at home on a soft surface. Do it slow and build the muscle memory. Meanwhile, there are other ways to get to your left: T pushes, shuffles, or depending on your flexibility, splits. Add some muscle memory and practice your skating with that right foot pushing off using the inner right edge. You can obviously use your left hand: you've got an excellent glove. While your at it, perhaps there's something to your strapping of your pads preventing you from getting the "angle of attack" with your inside right edge? Lastly, is your right hip and knee flexibility an issue? Maria has a lot of tips on her site to even out your flexibility if there's something to that. Stick with it.

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7 hours ago, IPv6Freely said:

I actually bought that guys entire series :)

The problem for me with that video above is the "execute a powerful slide" part is something I'm unable to do. If I'm going left to right, no problem. If I have to go right to left, I'm dead in the water. This is not unique to my goaltending. From a standing position with a shoulder width wide stance in street clothes, dropping my left knee down first is... well, I have to REALLY force myself to do it.

When ON the ice, if I push and slide from a standing position into a butterfly left to right I'm good. If I try to do it right to left, I almost break my left ankle and end up putting the right knee down first anyway. I don't know why. If I try to do it slowly and consciously, it's even worse! I'll get video of it the next time I play pickup. 

That would explain why I get up with my left leg first, always. Again, not unique to on the ice, either. In street clothes, getting up with my right leg first is REALLY awkward and challenging. 

I also can't push right to left if I'm already in my butterfly. I can't get good contact with my blade on the ice. 

This entire issue with being one side dominant is probably my biggest hurdle and the number one thing keeping me from improving. 

I TOTALLY understand the one side dominance issue.  I used to always get up on my left leg when I started.  When I started sliding, I could go to my right very easy, almost not at all to my left.  So, I made a conscious effort to get up on my right leg everytime when I was off the ice.  Built up my strength, and with some effort on ice, I can do both pretty well.  I still default to my left at times, but it's about 55/45 now.  And oddly enough, I am now way better at going to my left than my right when sliding.  Not sure what it is, but my left leg tends to slip out when I push to the right.  That might be a mobility/flexibility issue, as Fullright mentioned to you.

If you want to improve it, you have to work on it.  Even at night, do 10 reps of kneeling down, then getting up on your right leg.  I'd wager within 2 weeks you'll see a big difference on ice.

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FR ( edit: and now HSD  while I was typing) took the words out of my mouth - land based reps, extremely slow at he beginning to ensure you are doing it right, will train either leg to do what it needs to do. The key is in the word "reps" - the more you do the better you get - and it's free.

I bet 5 - 10 reps a couple of times through out he day over the course of a week would make a big difference. But again per Fullright, check out Maria's site.

As far as a "powerful slide" is concerned, as I get older (probably through necessity) I believe more and more it's not speed or power as much as technique.

Check this link of Price on a shootout - his smooth tracking of the player's motion allowed him to simply drop the right pad and block the shot - he let the player do all the work and snuffed the attempt with a simple pad block. And to belabour the point, it's the essentials at play here,specifically skating skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2D6WpFO_iA

 

Edited by Ghostender

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Still have to reply to the above posts and will do so when I’m at a computer.

For now, I’ll just mention that we lost again 8-3 last night. No video because we had one of the two refs that won’t let me use my GoPro.

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I'm not experienced/knowledgeable to offer any help but just wanted to tell you I am watching all of your videos so thanks for posting them!

I also like the video @Ghostender posted - I have never faced a shootout or penalty shot in a game, but I have tried to use the technique described in that video in stick-n-pucks (when the young players only want to do breakaways) and I can tell you it helps. Especially the part about keeping one stick length between you and the shooter before the "decision zone" (I think that's what he calls it).

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Your "Garbage Butterfly Slide" video speaks volumes to your problem with the push, thanks for posting.

The most important question to start is “is the difficulty you have due to some sort of previous injury?” If that is the case, you should see a doctor or PT or someone to determine what can be done. In the case of the video, it looks like your hip is locking up so that may be an issue.

If it is not a physical problem, I would do some land based reps where you forget about the lateral push, and simply do just the part where you drop, very slowly – say taking to the count of three to go from standing or even bent knee position to the drop position – hold onto a chair or desk if need be. You want to be very particular to watch your leg and that it does exactly what you want it to - that’s why you do it slowly. If you can perfect this at a slow speed, the increase in speed comes quite easily. You could then go from your stance into the drop (slowly) and then work up to the drop and push. Again you have to be sure this isn’t due to some physical restriction that would cause injury. If not enough reps should help. But again, it’s a gradual process. The goaltending wall isn’t built in a day.

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It looks like you drop to your right leg instead of push from it when you go to the left side & in BF push you don´t load your right leg enough. If it is not problem due to previous injury, it is just a practice - go realy slow and don´t rush yourself. I remember learning slides - bad, bad, bad.. and then ok, this is how it works?

btw.  One of my coaches at summer camp told me, when I tryed to do drills fast like more experienced/talented goalies: "How did you learned to run? You start to walk first, so try it slowly, speed and power comes with practice."

 Keep trying, no need to surrender!

Edited by mik

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Watch the video IP.  Notice when you slide to your right, your right leg drops first and you continue with the push from your left leg.  When you go the opposite way, you pretty much just drop as if going straight to a butterfly movement.  If my eyes are not deceiving me, I think your right leg even goes down earlier than your left, making it virtually impossible to push.  In order to practice this on-ice, get in your stance, then drop your left leg until it is as far down as you can go and still hold yourself up on your right leg.  Then push with your right leg.  

You seem to have the issue that I have seen with a lot of young/novice goalies.  When they start learning the butterfly, they tend to do a little jump before going down instead of just driving their knees down.  I think that is what you are up against when sliding to your left.

As to the backside recovery/power slide/butterfly push (or whatever other name someone has for it), mik is quite right - you are not loading your right leg for a strong push.  Maybe a little defeatism creeping in?  Get that leg up, knee almost in your face.  Plant that sucker in the ice like it owes you money and shove.  Don't worry about spinning or how you end up, at first.  Just get that push technique going and the rest will come.

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