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What to use for in-line


estogoalie
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I'm going to play a little in-line hockey this summer. It's in an indoor ice-rink, with the ice melted, so it's just a smooth concrete floor. I have an old set of ice gear that I plan to use, and an old pair of in-line skates. I was thinking to maybe protect the leg pads somehow. Is there some plastic things that I can buy to attach to the inner part that makes contact with the ground? Or maybe if I wind up playing more often, is it worth to buy a special set of roller hockey pads?

Thanks! :)

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1 hour ago, SaveByRichter35 said:

If you want something cheap and non permanent I remember something from the GSBB called slippery tape.  I know its sold on McMaster-Carr but  unfortunately I do not remember the part number.  Maybe someone else has it bookmarked from back in the day?

Slick sheets?

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  • 1 month later...

Yes.  Seriously too bad that GSBB is gone.  The inline thread was full of useful info.  I learned to make my slideplates from there.  For a more durable long lasting solution, slide plates trumped tape imo.  Tape was good for spots the plates didn't protect.   Maybe I should post my slideplates since GSBB is no more.

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Every pad is different, so every slide plate plan is different.  A GSBB member sewed a medial roll into his pads to attach the plate to.  I decided for a more direct approach since I only played inline at the time.  I would occasionally reapply duct tape to the boot to seal off the plate to the pad and prevent rotation issues from catching on the skate.

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Apropos of this thread - anyone have any recos on inline skates? Want to at least be able to skate outdoors, but unsure whether to to buy goalie-specific inline skates, or whether I should just buy some standard rollerblades. Thanks in advance for the input.

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Personally the only inline skates I own are goalie skates.  If I didn't have them and only wanted them for skating outside in the street it wouldn't matter to me what I had.  However, might be best fiscally to get goalie skates in case you ever plan on playing inline hockey.  That way you don't need to buy new skates again.

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6 minutes ago, BCZ said:

Apropos of this thread - anyone have any recos on inline skates? Want to at least be able to skate outdoors, but unsure whether to to buy goalie-specific inline skates, or whether I should just buy some standard rollerblades. Thanks in advance for the input.

Can recommend the Bauer Vapor Goalie Skate. Its like a 1X but softer. 
Biggest Problem would be if you use them skating on the street you will lose a lot of Grip on the wheel. Depending on if you want to play roller hockey this could lead to you slipping away in your stance.

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4 minutes ago, MovesLikeJagger said:

Can recommend the Bauer Vapor Goalie Skate. Its like a 1X but softer. 
Biggest Problem would be if you use them skating on the street you will lose a lot of Grip on the wheel. Depending on if you want to play roller hockey this could lead to you slipping away in your stance.

Just have to get outdoor wheels and it wouldn't be a problem

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3 hours ago, BCZ said:

Apropos of this thread - anyone have any recos on inline skates? Want to at least be able to skate outdoors, but unsure whether to to buy goalie-specific inline skates, or whether I should just buy some standard rollerblades. Thanks in advance for the input.

Depends what you want to use them for... inline goalie skates have much smaller wheels and a longer wheelbase. They wouldn’t be suitable for skating around your neighbourhood. If you plan to use them for just practicing goalie specific movements(t-pushes etc.) on a decent surface they would be fine. Or if you want to play online at some point.

If you just want to skate around for fitness I would get a player skate or just recreational in-line skates would be fine.

As others mentioned get outdoor wheels they will last much longer.

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5 minutes ago, Isles12 said:

Depends what you want to use them for... inline goalie skates have much smaller wheels and a longer wheelbase. They wouldn’t be suitable for skating around your neighbourhood. If you plan to use them for just practicing goalie specific movements(t-pushes etc.) on a decent surface they would be fine. Or if you want to play online at some point.

If you just want to skate around for fitness I would get a player skate or just recreational in-line skates would be fine.

As others mentioned get outdoor wheels they will last much longer.

I used to skate around in goalie skates plenty.  They work fine.  Labeda Predator chassis with 59mm wheels.  Its the really small 47mm wheels that could be a problem.

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20 hours ago, dreadlocked1 said:

Every pad is different, so every slide plate plan is different.  A GSBB member sewed a medial roll into his pads to attach the plate to.  I decided for a more direct approach since I only played inline at the time.  I would occasionally reapply duct tape to the boot to seal off the plate to the pad and prevent rotation issues from catching on the skate.

2020-04-23 19.51.38.jpg

2020-04-23 19.52.05.jpg

2020-04-23 19.52.30.jpg

2020-04-23 19.53.17.jpg

2020-04-23 19.53.48.jpg

What is that plastic material, and where did you buy it?

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I believe I puchased this UHMW polyurethane 1/8th or 1/16th inch sheets from Grainger.  Mcmastercarr will also have it.  It's very difficult to cut with scissors.  I made cardboard templates and then cut out all the pieces.  I used a hot lacing needle and pushed it right through the pads to make the lacing holes needed.  Laced up with some marine line that was comparable to the lacing going through the pads already.  This was back in 2009 or 2010.  They lasted a long time and kept those RBK 6ks going well past their intended lifespan. 

For 59mm inline goalie wheels, look for 80 durameter or higher for outdoor use.  I still have my 74A durameter indoor wheels on my goal skates but haven't taken them out on blacktop or concrete as they'll be gone within hours.  Just skating on  my small one car garage floor is eating them pretty good right now.  Since they're 5 years old, not a big deal to me, as I used to change out sets 2x a year, but I will look into an outdoor set if the lockdowns don't let up soon.

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5 hours ago, SaveByRichter35 said:

I used to skate around in goalie skates plenty.  They work fine.  Labeda Predator chassis with 59mm wheels.  Its the really small 47mm wheels that could be a problem.

Not saying you can’t do it however, they are less than ideal for skating around compared to a player skate.

The smaller wheels will wear out faster, be slower, and be a rougher ride than a larger wheel on a player or recreational skate.

5 hours ago, estogoalie said:

Are these only for Passau and Kenesky pads? Or you can put them on any pad? (And how do you put them on?)

Pretty sure you can put them on any pad you like and I’m not sure on install. I would contact passau or kenesky about that. I’ve never used them personally because I don’t like slide plates.

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