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5 minutes ago, ZeroGravitas said:

Wonder what would happen if the wire snaps. It looks like it's under tension. Would it snap and whip a goalie on the face? In the eye?

And how would we know when to replace the wire?

My thoughts exactly. On singhhockey.com it states the cage is a tensegrity structure like you said. Most likely that center bar would jerk either up or down depending on the cable that snaps. 

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, ThatCarGuy said:

My thoughts exactly. On singhhockey.com it states the cage is a tensegrity structure like you said. Most likely that center bar would jerk either up or down depending on the cable that snaps. 

For those wonder what a tensegrity structure is

image.thumb.jpeg.3902a117a35e00c15471004384a95f0d.jpeg

 

 

Edited by ThatCarGuy
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Just now, ThatCarGuy said:

Funny part is the holes are smaller than a cat eye 

It's not that, it's the wires under tension. Already pointed out by Zero, a wire that snaps could whip our face, and we have no real way to gauge when to replace it.

The other thing is that when it fails whatever caused that failure is going to be coming straight into our face. A puck that hits a standard cage and bends a bar will still deflect away from our face, 99% of the time; the only exception I know of is when it bends two bars at the "eye", and wedges itself in there. But those wires? Nah. I'll stick with a standard cage, thanks.

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I can't tell from the pictures - is it one cord that is laced all the way around? Or multiple cords? If it's one, a failure where the single cord under tension is cut seems like it could be catastrophic as opposed to a single cord.

I'm imagining a single cord failing and that whole single cord under tension unraveling and slicing you up pretty good.

The wire is made from Dyneema, if I'm reading correctly, which is similar to Kevlar. I know you need some pretty sharp scissors to handle Kevlar. Would this stuff slice you up worse/deeper than a shard of steel?

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3 hours ago, ThatCarGuy said:

My thoughts exactly. On singhhockey.com it states the cage is a tensegrity structure like you said. Most likely that center bar would jerk either up or down depending on the cable that snaps. 

I've read and reread this thread several times

In my mind I'm still reading "tensegrity" as "Tegridy"

image.png.50b51aaa1adde4e3ebe37fd1d0ca6e4e.png

If I understand the video and website correctly, it looks like the cross bars are actually made of Dyneema thread.  If the threads were to snap from impact, I don't think they would recoil the way we are expecting

Quote

Tensegrity structures are based on the combination of a few simple design patterns:

  • members loaded in either pure compression or pure tension, which means that the structure will only fail if the cables yield or the rods buckle. This enables the material properties and cross-sectional geometry of each member to be optimized to the particular load it carries.
  • preload or tensional prestress allows cables to always be in tension, to maintain structural integrity.
  • mechanical stability, which allows the members to remain in tension/compression as stress on the structure increases. The structure also becomes stiffer as cable tension increases.

Because of these patterns, no structural member experiences a bending moment and there are no shear stresses within the system. This can produce exceptionally strong and rigid structures for their mass and for the cross section of the components. The loading of at least some tensegrity structures causes an auxetic response and negative Poisson ratio, e.g. the T3-prism and 6-strut tensegrity icosahedron.

Source: Wikipedia

Paging our resident engineer @maxtm30

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, ryan_0 said:

Lace less skates and cage less helmets, what a time to be alive 

Strapless pads are my prediction on what's next.  Why have straps when we can wear velcro lined socks to hook into velcro lined leg channels??

Edited by seagoal
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As long as the structure isn't overly rigid, it should be fine.

I still worry about stick blades and butt ends though, not necessarily more than a cateye, but I already don't wear a cateye because of that.

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18 hours ago, ZeroGravitas said:

I can't tell from the pictures - is it one cord that is laced all the way around? Or multiple cords? If it's one, a failure where the single cord under tension is cut seems like it could be catastrophic as opposed to a single cord.

I'm imagining a single cord failing and that whole single cord under tension unraveling and slicing you up pretty good.

The wire is made from Dyneema, if I'm reading correctly, which is similar to Kevlar. I know you need some pretty sharp scissors to handle Kevlar. Would this stuff slice you up worse/deeper than a shard of steel?

I did also hear and see the bullet proof vest example. Now I'm no engineer but I still have a brain (I'm a goalie after all), and how I understand kevlar vests is that it's a multiple layers of interwoven fabric and kevlar, not under tension, but woven is a multi directional pattern to prevent the bullet or whatever to pierce the vest. The wires on the mask is a pretty thin strand or multiple strands creating a single wire tout under extreme tension, no backup layers or deceleration response like the vest or DO3. The free floating middle bar is probably how vibration impact is dispersed, but it still makes me question as well the difference between a steel bar bend and a full on snap of the wire(s).

The man is a space engineer and is surely a mathematical and physics genius but I still challenge the idea. I guess we'll soon find out more if this catches wind in main stream media or even makes it to the NHL boardroom. 

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, RichMan said:

I did also hear and see the bullet proof vest example. Now I'm no engineer but I still have a brain (I'm a goalie after all), and how I understand kevlar vests is that it's a multiple layers of interwoven fabric and kevlar, not under tension, but woven is a multi directional pattern to prevent the bullet or whatever to pierce the vest. The wires on the mask is a pretty thin strand or multiple strands creating a single wire tout under extreme tension, no backup layers or deceleration response like the vest or DO3. The free floating middle bar is probably how vibration impact is dispersed, but it still makes me question as well the difference between a steel bar bend and a full on snap of the wire(s).

The man is a space engineer and is surely a mathematical and physics genius but I still challenge the idea. I guess we'll soon find out more if this catches wind in main stream media or even makes it to the NHL boardroom. 

The free floating middle bar is what makes the whole thing a tensegrity structure. It probably disperses vibrations a little, but that isn't its main function.

56 minutes ago, keeperton said:

As long as the structure isn't overly rigid, it should be fine.

I still worry about stick blades and butt ends though, not necessarily more than a cateye, but I already don't wear a cateye because of that.

It has to be "overly rigid". If those wires bend out of the way even slightly then they might as well not be there.

Edited by CJ Boiss
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1 hour ago, seagoal said:

Ha.  Ok Vaughn fan boy.

My first set of proper gear was Vaughn, actually. Joey MacDonald's pads, Chad Johnson's blocker, Kari Ramo's glove. Still have the pads (ODR stuff) and glove (display piece). Been wearing Warrior since, though.

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Today's post on IG shows it being tested with an 83 mph shot as opposed to the Canadian testing standard of 81 mph. Bounced right off.  I think everyone including him is waiting for more thorough testing including longevity and failure modes. I don't think it's fair to say yet whether or not it could be a long term solution.  He's probably looking for an investor/equipment manufacturer to continue development and testing.  My guess is that if any company would agree to look at and maybe develop it, it would be Warrior, who let's face it has been the leader in innovation for the last decade. I would try one after some more testing, but that's just me.

As far as cat eye vs. certified, I'm pretty sure that would not be an issue down the line.  All it would require is a denser pattern of wires to reach the certified standard. Even with a full certified pattern, the thinness of the wires could be a distinct visual advantage with no worry about sticks. Also could obviously be a weight saver.

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